Vanguard: What if Black Women Have Always Led the Movement for Voting Rights?

As we continue to engage the powerful stories evident in The 1619 Project, we have invited Scholar Martha S. Jones to share her incredible research on women's suffrage and the role Black women played in actualizing gaining the right to vote. Her book is described here: In the standard story, the suffrage crusade began in Seneca Falls in 1848 and ended with the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920. But this overwhelmingly white women’s movement did not win the vote for most black women. Securing their rights required a movement of their own.

In Vanguard, acclaimed historian Martha S. Jones offers a new history of African American women’s political lives in America. She recounts how they defied both racism and sexism to fight for the ballot, and how they wielded political power to secure the equality and dignity of all persons. From the earliest days of the republic to the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act and beyond, Jones excavates the lives and work of black women — Maria Stewart, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper, Fannie Lou Hamer, and more — who were the vanguard of women’s rights, calling on America to realize its best ideals.                


About the Presenter: Professor Martha S. Jones is the Society of Black Alumni Presidential Professor and Professor of History at The Johns Hopkins University. She is a legal and cultural historian whose work examines how black Americans have shaped the story of American democracy. Professor Jones is the author of Birthright Citizens: A History of Race and Rights in Antebellum America (Cambridge University Press, 2018), winner of the Organization of American Historians Liberty Legacy Award for the best book in civil rights history, the American Historical Association Littleton Griswold Prize for the best book in American legal history, and the American Society for Legal History John Phillip Reid book award for the best book in Anglo-American legal history. Professor Jones is also author of All Bound Up Together: The Woman Question in African American Public Culture 1830-1900 (University of North Carolina Press, 2007) and a coeditor of Toward an Intellectual History of Black Women (University of North Carolina Press, 2015, together with many important articles and essay.

Dial-In Information

Regsitration is required.

Thursday, October 29 at 4:30pm to 6:00pm

Virtual Event
Event Type

Gatherings & Meetings

Event Topic

Diversity & Inclusion

Event Audience

Students, Faculty, General Public, Staff

Tags

1619 Project, Voting, Family and Friends

Cost

free

Group
Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion
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